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Here at the video lounge you can catch up on all the latest PSA videos and browse through some archive union-related documentaries too.

 

You can find more PSA videos over at our YouTube channel here.



President and CEO of Restructuring Associates in Washington DC, Tom Schneider has 35 years’ experience transforming some of the top companies and government organisations in the US, Canada and Australia.Tom was in New Zealand recently at the invitation of the PSA. During his two-week visit he met with senior cabinet ministers and public sector CEOs ,managers,PSA staff and delegates and gave public lectures.  
   

Keep New Zealand Working

 

This election, the PSA is running a campaign to remind voters of the value of public services and what we all stand to lose if the government keeps up its cuts.

 

This video shows the launch of the election campaign:

 

www.keepNZworking.co.nz

 

MC Raybon Kan introduces PSA President Paula Scholes and PSA National Secretaries Richard Wagstaff and Brenda Pilott.  

 

 

 


  

A Year in Review

A video created for Annual Members' Meeting in 2011. 

 

The PSA Year in Review looks back on the union-related events that shaped  2010.

 

The video also looks ahead to the challenges that PSA members will face in 2011.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



   

PSA Members

Public servants are just faceless, backroom bureaucrats, right?

 

Wrong, public servants and the services they provide are the backbone of our country.

 

In this video PSA members from around the country take 5 seconds to tell you who they are and what they do. 

 

 

 


 

Cuts to Public Services = Cuts to us all

These two videos show the variety of public services that we rely on everyday.

 

Share them with your family, friends and colleagues and let people know that cuts to public services are cuts to us all.

 

 

 

 


   

Public Private Partnerships

A series of videos from international expert David Hall on why Public Private Partnerships are a bad idea for New Zealand.

 

 

 

 


 

Budget 2011

 

PSA National Secretary Brenda Pilott comments on Budget 2011.

 

The government announced further public service cuts to the tune of $1b.

 

This means more cuts to the vital services that families in New Zealand rely on.

 

 

 



   

Someone Else's Country

Someone Else’s Country looks critically at the radical economic changes implemented by the 1984 Labour Government - where privatisation of state assets was part of a wider agenda that sought to remake New Zealand as a model free market state.

 

The trickle-down ‘Rogernomics’ rhetoric warned of no gain without pain, and here the theory is counterpointed by the social effects (redundant workers, Post Office closures).

 

Made by Alister Barry in 1996 when the effects were raw, the film draws extensively on archive footage and interviews with key “witnesses to history”.



 

In a Land of Plenty

The tagline runs: "The story of unemployment in New Zealand" and In A Land of Plenty is an exploration of just that; it takes as its starting point the consensus from

 

The Depression onwards that Godzone economic policy should focus on achieving full employment, and explores how this was radically shifted by the 1984 Labour government.

 

Director Alister Barry's perspective is clear, as he trains a humanist lens on ‘Rogernomics' to argue for the policy's negative effects on society, "as a new poverty-stricken underclass developed".

 



A Civilised Society

This documentary looks at the new right ideology that transformed public education in the 80s and 90s and the schism it caused with teachers.

 

 Interviews with parents, teachers and unionists are cut together with archive footage of treasury officials and politicians advocating that schools be run as businesses.

 

There are vexed board of trustees' meetings, an infamous deal between Avondale College and Pepsi, and teachers take their opposition from the classroom to the streets.

 

The film is the third in Alister Barry's series critical of neo-liberal reform in NZ.